Niklas Heese und Roxana Takeh – Report von der Ausstellungs-Front

Redaktion Ausbildung und Berufsgründung, media kommentieren

niklas-heese-2016Reporting from the Front heißt das Thema der aktuellen Architekturbiennale in Venedig. Ihr Direktor Alejandro Aravena hat einen Perspektivwechsel von den kulturellen und künstlerischen zu den politischen, ökonomischen, sozialen und Umweltaspekten der Architektur zum Leitmotiv der internationalen Architekturausstellung gemacht, die sich so gut wie keine andere für einen Wochenendtrip von München aus anbietet.
Damit reagiert er unter anderem auf eine weltweite Bewegung in der Architektur Rechnung, die man „Soziale Architektur“ nennen kann, Architektur für die Gesellschaft. Oft wird in diesem Zusammenhang der in Berlin ansässige Architekt Francis Kéré genannt, der zum Studieren nach Deutschland kam und mittlerweile unter anderem in seiner Heimat Burkina Faso eine Vielzahl gemeinnütziger Projekte realisiert hat. Wer in München Inspiration sucht, sollte sich die Ausstellung Francis Kéré. Radically Simple im Architekturmuseum der TU ansehen, viel eindrucksvoller kann eine Architektenbiographie nicht sein.
Die Biennale und die Kéré- Ausstelung sind Thema dieses Artikels, wobei ich es leider nicht nach Venedig geschafft habe. Die gute Wendung dabei: Roxana Takeh, Architekturstudentin an der ENSAPL Lille in Frankreich, berichtet jetzt von der Front.

“Less is beautiful” - From Venezia to München

“Less is beautiful” – From Venezia to München

After one-year-living-in-the-beautiful-Shanghai’s-bubble, you come back home and realize how much things have changed. From the dynamic country you left, you find a wounded one. (I imply France and its previous events)
In those gloominess times, some geniuses are still alive. Alejandro Aravena is part of them, trust me. Let me embark you.
29th October 2016, 7 o’clock, München Hauptbahnhof, Gleis 7.
While our train was racing throw Tirol and almost playing to hide-and-seek with its shinny and lovely mountains, the maiden and restorative journey could begin: Venezia, Aravena and his message of hope were waiting us.
After two pieces of pizza in our stomach, a short “Ciao” to Grand Canal and St Mark’s Basilica, la Biennale di Venezia was ours and none of us were really prepared for what we would see. We were just free, curious and innocent minds.

Arsenale. Entrance hall. 16 o’clock. First room. First slap.
Without paying any attention, you could describe it as a large room surrounded by white thin brick’s walls and a low ceiling where metal bars were hanged. More generally, a “nice photogenic place” where light and shadow play together. Hopefully, you also noticed afterwards that walls were in fact piled up pieces of plaster and those bars: the metal frame of partition walls.
My interpretation: those elements actually highlight what nobody can or want to see. Who, at an exhibition, takes care of the material used to construct a picture rail? Furthermore, who ever thought about what it will become once the exhibition is finished? This is what Aravena wants you to deal with. With the other face of the coin, the forgotten one, the one that we sometimes don’t expect to face.
This smart and skilled introduction describes perfectly how to appreciate the exhibition: a truth-facing architecture from another side.

The photogenic Arsenale’s entrance hall.

The photogenic Arsenale’s entrance hall.

So now, put your fears and prejudices next to your computer and come on, I take you into my three favourite “architecture truths”.

_Architecture is not a dead mass, architecture lives!
Who never had the wish one evening to completely change the interior design of their flat but after some tries realized the size of the bed doesn’t fit to the width of the room? Or who never wished in their deep and shameful dreams to extend their bathroom to install a Jacuzzi?
LAN architecture answers you: “It is possible.” The only French architecture company this year, LAN architecture, sets the bar high: attractive big models fully furnished and perfectly sized so that even children as 2-meters-high basketball men could have a look on it without squinting.
“Carré possible”, Bègles, France. 79 apartments with the aim to make them adaptable. Facing high m2 prices, the company took advantage on it in diverting the problem: outdoor spaces are not account on m2 prices? So let’s insert them in the project, they are liveable, enjoyable and furthermore possible extensions. A thin facade will also permit the possible evolution.
To illustrate their intention, LAN architecture showed, on one side portraits of the inhabitants in “Carré possible” and how they imagine they future flat. On the other side you could play like a child to find which apartment belongs to who in the model. “Oh this is the crazy woman who wants a home cinema!” “Hummm that apartment is surely the artist’s one!” The huge exterior spaces (loggias, terraces) were transformed for some, into a greenhouse, an atelier, a swimming-pool thanks to its efficient idea. To conclude: Yes, dreams can become true and even better, French architects can fulfil them. If once you cross Bègles to go to holiday in Spain, stop and enjoy.

The four German urban districts with self-built techniques in an enormous blue-foam model

The four German urban districts with self-built techniques in an enormous blue-foam model

_Architecture as a shelter: NEUBAU
If you are a “Münchner” and if taking the U-Bahn is familiar to you, you couldn’t miss some advertising posters dealing with immigration. To those who passed by: Munich is trying to get inhabitants involved in this current issue with some actions as: “Vermieten Sie Wohnraum – Helfen Sie Flüchtlingen!”. So, you probably understand it: immigration is a THE topic of the year and La Biennale took it as reference.
Some rooms away from Arsenale’s entrance, between two bricks columns, – as a response to Aravena’s Quinta Monroy Housing – BeL Sozietät für Architektur proposed an idea: a five-story concrete frame as a trunk of the building that the future owners (immigrants) will complete by themselves thanks to a book explaining with precise sections and steps how to build, for example a balustrade or a partition wall. Cheap, simple and efficient. Why didn’t we think about it before? Self-built techniques are certainly the future!

A “mise en abyme”: watching construction sites while sitting in scaffoldings

A “mise en abyme”: watching construction sites while sitting in scaffoldings

_Architecture and its underlying facts
As the famous proverb relates: “Appearances are deceptive.“ this way of thinking could be sticked to the Polish Pavillon and its exhibition. While walking throw scaffoldings, you are invited to sit on a piece of wood in front of a screen, in front of a truth. A dashboard camera takes you from Łódź to Warsaw into construction sites where you share the everyday life of polish workers. Over-hours, bad working qualities, injuries, illness, images and words are strong enough to make you feel the danger. “They hold you to build, and not ask for money” says one. French architecture students have to complete a minimum of two weeks internship in a construction site. I did it during my second year of Bachelor. I swear, the hidden part of a construction can be as hard as beautiful.
As an ironic end, the last room represents a showroom with perfect white walls and a huge sofa with a super-perfect 3d rendering. Before/after? Seen/invisible? A lot to think about. By setting the record straight, Poland let you participate “#Fair building How to make it possible? Which responsibility is it?” What are architects and more generally society without workers?

“Reporting from the Front” was not just an exhibition, “Reporting from the Front” was human, enjoying live, asking you about what you never thought about, tearing you down and showing out face to face a reality of this world. A reality that few of us knew about. I am fully convinced: “Reporting from the Front” is a message of hope. At least now it is becoming quite clear: « Less is beautiful ». Thank you.

Francis Kéré: Radikal Sympathisch

Während in Venedig noch Architektur-Touristen aus aller Welt ihre Perspektive auf die Architektur verändern, wird in der Rotunde der Pinakothek der Moderne eine Ausstellung eröffnet, die ebenfalls als Report from the Front angesehen werden kann. Nach seinen Vorrednern, die neben ein paar exzellenten Passagen vor allem lange geredet haben, spricht Francis Kéré. Er redet ruhig und mit tiefer Stimme über seine Freude, in der Stadt in Deutschland ausgestellt zu werden, in die er zuerst kam, damals ohne Deutschkenntnisse, ohne höhere Bildung. Nach seiner Rede wird die Ausstellung so überfüllt sein, dass sich davor eine Schlange bildet und der ein oder andere sich ein Glas Weißwein für die Wartezeit organisiert.

Als Sohn des Häuptlings seines Dorfes Gando lernt Francis Kéré als erster in seiner Familie Lesen und Schreiben, im nächsten Dorf, 40 Kilometer Schulweg. Durch ein Stipendium kann er für eine Ausbildung zum Entwicklungshelfer nach Deutschland kommen. Nach der Ausbildung schreibt er sich für ein Architekturstudium an der TU Berlin ein. Noch während seines Studiums gründet er Schulbausteine für Gando e.V., um Geld zu sammeln für den Bau einer Schule in seinem Heimatdorf.

Schüler im Operndorf Laongo (Bild: Kéré Architecture)

Schüler im Operndorf Laongo (Bild: Kéré Architecture)

Die Ausstellung beginnt in einem Wald aus hellen Baumstämmen, führt chronologisch durch Werk, das zwar erst von 2001 bis 2016 reicht, aber trotzdem schon unglaublich umfassend ist. Es umfasst neben temporären Ausstellungsbeiträgen und internationalen Architektur-und Städtebauprojekten eine Menge von Entwürfen in Burkina Faso, darunter ein Entwurf für die neue Nationalversammlung des Landes und das 2012 fertiggestellte Operndorf in Laongo. Das Operndorf, das Francis Kéré zusammen mit Christoph Schlingensief ins Leben gerufen hatte, hat besonders dazu beigetragen, dass Kéré nach und nach auch in Deutschland bekannter wurde.
Am Ende der Ausstellung wird ein weiterer Entwurf Kérés gezeigt, ein Stuhl aus zwei gebogenen Stahlrohren und Holz, ganz simpel gehalten erinnert er an das Dach seines ersten Projekts, der Schule in seinem Heimatdorf.

Nationalversammlung in Ouagadougou: Von den Stufen aus sieht man über weite Teile der flachen Hauptstadt (Bild: Kéré Architecture)

Nationalversammlung in Ouagadougou: Von den Stufen aus sieht man über weite Teile der flachen Hauptstadt (Bild: Kéré Architecture)

Die Schule in Gando wird noch während Kérés Studienzeit realisiert. Drei Klassenräume mit massiven Lehmwänden und -decken werden von einem weit überstehenden Blechdach vor allem vor der Sonne geschützt. Das leicht gewölbte Dach ist von der Decke durch ein Raumfachwerk aus dünnen Stahlstäben getrennt, sodass Luft hindurchströmen kann und zur Kühlung beiträgt. Die Wände tragen durch ihre enorme thermische Masse zu einem besseren Raumklima bei, da sie sich in der Nacht abkühlen und sich tagsüber nur langsam erhitzen.
Der Entwurf versucht jedoch nicht nur durch sein Klimakonzept und lokale Materialien, sondern vor allem durch die Einbindung der Bevölkerung nicht nur umweltfreundlich und kosteneffizient, sondern sozial nachhaltig zu sein. Das heißt, die Dorfbewohner investieren Zeit und Mühe in den Bau der Schule, lernen etwas über Baukonstruktion und fühlen sich für ihr gemeinsames Werk verantwortlich. Das Projekt hat sogar zwei Nachbardörfer dazu inspiriert, nach demselben Prinzip eine Schule zu bauen. 2004 wurde Kéré für den Bau der Schule in Gando mit dem Aga Khan Award for Architecture ausgezeichnet, was ihm weltweite Aufmerksamkeit verschaffte.

Kinder vor der Schule in Gando (Bild: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk)

Kinder vor der Schule in Gando (Bild: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk)

Kéré beendet seine Rede so gut gelaunt, wie er sie begonnen hat damit, wie er am liebsten jeden einzeln durch die Ausstellung führen würde.
Aus einem Dorf in einem der ärmsten Länder der Welt unter die Top-Architekten unserer Zeit zu kommen, und dabei bescheiden zu bleiben, das macht ihn zu einem Vorbild für Leute auf der ganzen Welt, nicht nur für Architekturbegeisterte.

Sozial engagierte Architektur wie die von Francis Kéré ist mitverantwortlich für die Wahl des Themas der diesjährigen Architekturbiennale, die eine ganze Reihe an Themen ins Rampenlicht rückt, die ansonsten häufig übersehen werden. Speziell Soziale Architektur ist nicht nur aufgrund wachsender Disparitäten ein Top-Thema, sondern weil sie Menschen mitreißen kann. Nicht zuletzt beweisen Büros wie das von Francis Kéré, dass soziales Bauen kein naives Gutmenschentum, keine Utopie ist, sondern ganz große Architektur sein kann. Also ab in die Ausstellung, zu Francis Kéré. Radically Simple im Architekturmuseum der TUM!

Niklas Heese ist Architekturstudent an der TU München. Die letzten zwei Semester hat er in Shanghai an der Tongji Universität studiert, hier darüber berichtet und setzt die Reihe an Artikeln jetzt von München aus fort.

@NiklasHeese auf Twitter.

Roxana Takeh ist Architekturstudentin an der ENSAPL Lille in Frankreich. Gerade in ihrem zweiten Master-Jahr, absolviert sie sechs Monate lang ein Praktikum in München.

 

Niklas Heese
Architekturstudent

 

Schreibe einen Kommentar